DEPARTMENT.FACULTY

photo
Dr. Orus Ilyas
  • DEPARTMENT_STAFF.QUALIFICATION

    Ph.D, M.Sc

  • DEPARTMENT_STAFF.DESIGNATION

    Associate Professor

  • DEPARTMENT_STAFF.THRUST_AREA

    Wildlife conservation, Biodiversity conservation and management; Animal Ecology; Population Dynamics, Conservation biology; Human -Animal Conflict; Animal Behaviour and Socio economic aspects. , https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vvhy75f-ft8

  • DEPARTMENT_STAFF.ADDRESS

    AB-91, Medical Colony, AMU Aligarh, Dept of Wildlife Sciences, AMU Aligarh

  • DEPARTMENT_STAFF.MOBILE

    9412501043 , 9412501043

  • DEPARTMENT_STAFF.EMAIL

    orus16@gmail.com , o.ilyas.wl@amu.ac.in

  • DEPARTMENT_STAFF.TIME_TABLE

    Time table for MSc III semesterMSc IV semester DissertationMSc III semester 2021 (Biodiversity studies and Management)

DEPARTMENT_STAFF.COMPLETE_CV

Dr. Orus Ilyas is working as Associate Professor in Biodiversity & Environmental study, Dept of Wildlfie Sciences. She has been involved in field research on mammals, especially the ungulates community in India since 1995. She worked in high altitude himalayas for more than 10 years. Her doctoral research was on "Status and conservation of ungulates in the Kumaon Himalayas with special reference to aspect of the ecology of barking deer (Muntiacus muntjak) and goral (Nemorhaedus goral)". Prior to joining as Assistant Professor in Dept of Wildlife sciences in 2009 she worked on various projects ranging from community participation to species conservation and ecology, funded by many organizations i.e. WSI, WWF-India, CAPART, DANIDA, UGC, UPFD-TERI. She has also worked as young scientist under Fast Track Program of DST, and surveyed high altitude Himalayas for conservation and status of musk deer in Uttranchal Himalayas. She has served four terms of "Asia Coordinator" of Deer Specialist group or SSC/IUCN. Currently apart from M.Sc. teaching she has completed six projects on different aspects of ungulates from high altitude Himalayas to Central India. Currently she is working on Ecology of ungulates in Panna Tiger Reserve, funded by CSIR-Govt. of India under their Extra Mural Research Grant. In 2019 she secured Rs. 20 Lakhs from corporate section under their Corporate Social Responsibility for the Dept of Wildlife Sciences to organize the 1st International Conservation Conference-2019 from 21st -23rd October. She has visited more than 10 courtiers for different academic programs, She presented papers in International COnferences, and also chaird the full session in IMC, at Christchuch NewZealand, and Bijing China. She has delivered many popular public talks in different organizations such as ISER Mohali, St. Stephens college, DU, invited by Wellcome Trust DBT-India Alliance. She is the reviewer of many reputed journals, such as Mammalia, Journal of Zoology, Mammalian Biology, Threatened Taxa etc, and published many papers in national and international peer-review journals. Her research Interest include biodiversity conservation; Conservation genetics, population ecology, herbivore ecology, Wildlife policy and legislation quantitative ecology, and human-animal conflict.

  1. The inter-linking of rivers and biodiversity conservation: a study of Panna Tiger Reserve, Madhya Pradesh, India
    The Panna tiger reserve is one of the best examples of the most successful tiger re-introduction programme from zero tiger in 2009 to 54 in 2019. The Government of India has approved the proposal of interlinking of the two rivers, viz. Ken in Madhya Pradesh and Betwa in Uttar Pradesh, to provide surplus water to the local population of drought prone areas of Bundelkhand, UP. This river interlinking will be submerging around 58.03 sq. km of the Critical Tiger Habitat. Our study on vegetation and major prey species of tiger shows higher densities in submerged areas. The NITI Ayog report of 2019 provided one of the best example of the locals of Jakhni village of Banda district of Bundelkhand which managed the severe water crisis. The sensitivity of tiger reserve that project involves need a close attention, which this essay attempts at arguing.

    Download PDF
  2. Projected distribution and climate refugia of endangered Kashmir musk deer Moschus cupreus in greater Himalaya, South Asia. (2020). Scientific Report

    Kashmir musk deer Moschus cupreus (KMD) are the least studied species of musk deer. Genetically validated occurrence records of KMD to construct species distribution models using Maximum Entropy was completed. it shows that the distribution of KMD is limited between central Nepal on the east and north-east Afghanistan on the west and is primarily determined by precipitation of driest quarter, annual mean temperature, water vapor, and precipitation during the coldest quarter. Precipitation being the most influential determinant of distribution suggests the importance of pre-monsoon moisture for growth of the dominant vegetation, Himalayan birch Betula utilis and Himalayan fir Abies spectabilis, in KMD's preferred forests. All four Representative Concentration Pathway Scenarios result an expansion of suitable habitat in Uttarakhand, India, west Nepal and their associated areas in China in 2050s and 2070s but a dramatic loss of suitable habitat elsewhere (Kashmir region and Pakistan-Afghanistan border). About 1/4th of the current habitat will remain as climate refugia in future. Since the existing network of protected areas will only include a tiny fraction (4%) of the climatic refugia of KMD, the fate of the species will be determined by the interplay of more urgent short-term forces of poaching and habitat degradation and long-term forces of climate change.

  3. Evaluation of suitable habitat for Wild boar (Sus scrofa) in Pench Tiger Reserve, Madhya Pradesh, India. International Journal of Ecology and Environmental Sciences

    Habitat assessment is the primary task to ensure in-situ conservation of any species for their better management. We modeled habitat suitability of wild pig (Sus scrofa) in Pench Tiger Reserve (PTR) using Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) technique in GIS environment. Land use Land cover (LULC) map derived from Landsat 8 data along with other secondary inputs viz. topography and administrative coverage of the reserve were used as inputs in the model. Field experience and expert’s comments are considered for assigning the final weightages to layers. The model revealed that a significant area of the reserve is suitable for the wild pig as they are generalist in nature that forms an important part of the overall ecology of the study area. Our result revealed that wild pig prefers the areas which are close to the human habitat. This study also incorporates that remote sensing and GIS are a very important tool for wildlife habitat modeling with minimum efforts and low budget

  4. Where are they? Where will they be? In pursuit of current and future whereabouts of endangered Himalayan musk deer.Mammalian Biology

    Conservation and management of environmentally suitable areas, that support survival and persistence of species, are keys to protect wildlife in their natural habitat. Populations of Himalayan musk deer Moschus leucogaster, an endemic species in Asia, are listed as endangered in the IUCN red list, requiring immediate conservation actions before their extinction in the wild. In order to model and map the current and future (under projected climate change settings) climatically-suitable area for the species, Maxent modeling technique, that requires presence-only records, was employed. As predictors, we extracted 19 bioclimatic variables from ‘WorldClim’ database with a ?1 km spatial resolution and used 10 uncorrelated bioclimatic variables as inputs. As indicated by a high area under ROC curve (AUC) value (>0.9), Maxent well performed and predicted climatically-suitable habitat for the species along the Hindukush Himalaya, where the species is known to occur. Annual mean temperature appeared to most influence the distribution of potential habitat for the species. An expansion of species’ habitat was noticed in the Indian and Tibetan part of species range, suggesting a potential future effect of climate change on the species distribution. The findings of this study could assist wildlife managers in devising conservation plans for the current and future conservation of the species in the context of climate change. This is the first study to model and map the current and future distribution of the species in its rang

  5. Food and Feeding Habits of Gaur ( Bos gaurus ) in Highlands of Central India: A Case Study at Pench Tiger Reserve, Madhya Pradesh (India). Zoological Science, ISSN- 02890003
    Indian gaur (Bos gaurus) is one of nine species of wild oxen found in the world. They are largely confined to evergreen, semi-evergreen, and moist deciduous forests, but also occur in dry deciduous forest areas at the periphery of their range. According to the IUCN Red List ( 2017 ), the estimated population of gaur in India is between 15,000 and 35,000 individuals, and probably due to this, despite the gaur's vast range of distribution, they are listed as a vulnerable species by IUCN and listed as schedule-I of the Indian Wildlife Protection Act ( 1972 ) as well as in appendix-I in CITES ( 2003 ). Gaur is not a well studied species, and baseline data are thus needed to support conservation efforts. We studied the feeding habits of gaur in Pench Tiger Reserve. Pench Tiger Reserve is the 19th tiger reserve in India, situated in the Seoni and Chhindwara districts of MP, India (21°41'35?N 79°14'54?E). Diet composition of gaur was studied by micro-histological examination of 32 dung piles collected from different sampling plots in different seasons. For this purpose, 169 sampling plots were established at an interval of 200 m. To locate gaur faecal matter, a circular plot of 10 m radius was laid within each sampling plot. Eighty-eight permanent reference slides of available plants were prepared and used for plant fragment identification from the dung piles. A total of 29 plant species were identified from dung piles of gaur. On average, 44.51% of grass-fragments were detected in the diet of gaur, suggesting that gaurs are primarily grazers in the Pench Tiger Reserve.


  6. Food habits of Barking Deer (Muntiacus muntjak muntjak) and Goral (Nemorhaedus goral bedfordi) in Binsar Wildlife Sanctuary, India, Mammalia, 2004

    Food habits of barking deer and goral were investigated during pre and post-monsoon seasons in 1998 in Binsar Wildlife Sanctuary in Kumaon, Himalaya. Three line transects were established to sample pellet groups of both species. Pellet groups were collected in permanent plots of 10 m radius established at an interval of 50 m along each line transect. Pellet groups of both species were analysed microscopically to determine the ingested plant. The diet showed the barking deer to be predominantly a browser while the goral was a grazer. In the barking deer diet the browse to grass ratio was 87 % / 13 % in pre-monsoon season, and 78 % / 22 % during post-monsoon season. In goral diet the browse to grass ratio was 12 % / 88 % and 3 % / 97 % in pre- and post-monsoon seasons respectively. The barking deer fed on 8, 6, 18 and 8, 8, 19 species of tree, shrub and forbs during pre and post-monsoon season respectively. The occurrence of tree, shrub and forb species in barking deer diet was in proportion to their availability in habitat during both seasons. The goral diet was dominated by plant fragments belonging to 1, 5, 11 and 2,1, 6 species of tree, shrub and forb during pre and post-monsoon season respectively. None of the plant species was used up more than its availability.

  7. Habitat and feeding ecology of alpine musk deer (Moschus chrysogaster) in Kedarnath Wildlife Sanctuary, Uttarakhand, India

    The alpine musk deer, Moschus chrysogaster, a small member of family Moschidae, is a primitive deer threatened due to poaching and habitat loss, and therefore classified as Endangered by IUCN and also listed in Appendix I of CITES. Although the species is legally protected in India under Wildlife Protection Act 1972, conservation of the species requires better understanding of its distribution and resource-use pattern; therefore, a study on its feeding and habitat ecology was conducted from February 2011 to February 2014, at Kedarnath Wildlife Sanctuary. The Sanctuary is one of the known remaining habitats for musk deer in India. Four locations, namely, Shokhark I, Shokhark II, Tungnath and Chandrashila, were intensively monitored and further categorised on the basis of habitats and altitudinal gradient. The habitat overlap between musk deer and all other ungulate species of the area was calculated through Pianka's overlap index. The results indicated a large overlap between musk deer and Himalayan tahr. Species dietary spectra were studied using microhistological techniques for faecal pellet-group analysis coupled with Bonferroni approach. The dicotyledon to monocotyledon ratios were found to be 73.62-26.38% and 52.016- 47.984% in the pre- and post-monsoon seasons, respectively. The study showed that the musk deer is predominantly a browser. The most preferred plant species of the animals were found to be Gaultheria trichophylla, Ophiopogon intermedius., Cyperus sp. and Sibbaldia cuneata. During the field survey, opportunistic sightings of the species were also recorded. The species was found to be restricted to areas where the density of preferred vegetation was high. Therefore, it is recommended to provide strict protection to the areas such as Shokhark.

    Download PDF
LISTDownloadUPLOADED DATE
Unit III Biodiversity management
11/01/2022
Biodiversity management UNIT I
13/12/2021
Unit II Biodiversity management
11/01/2022
Paper I Biodiversity Management
31/08/2020
Study material for UNIT 1 of Biodiversity management
31/08/2020
28/09/2020
28/09/2020
28/09/2020
28/09/2020
28/09/2020
28/09/2020
28/09/2020
28/09/2020
28/09/2020
28/09/2020
26/10/2020
Power points for Unit IV
22/11/2020
Study material for Unit IV
22/11/2020
PCQ Method_Unit IV
22/11/2020
Herpitofauna_Pitfall method_Unit IV
22/11/2020
Quadrate method_Unit IV
22/11/2020
Territory Mapping_UNit IV
22/11/2020
MSc IV semester Disseration topics 2020-2021
18/02/2021